Protecting Your Future Begins with Securing The Strongest Defense Against Criminal Charges
Protecting Your Future Begins with Securing The Strongest Defense Against Criminal Charges
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What circumstances could lead to dropping homicide charges?

If you or a loved one face serious allegations related to a homicide in Illinois, it may not lead to a conviction. Individuals have a constitutional right to a defense directed at countering a prosecutor’s evidence. The charges may also drop if officials arrest and charge another defendant.

As noted by the Marshall Project, the “clearance rate” describes the number of homicide cases that detectives solve each year. To clear a crime, law enforcement typically arrests and charges a suspect. In 2020, law enforcement officials nationwide cleared only one out of every two homicide cases. Officials and crime scholars believe homicides may have become too difficult to investigate properly in many cases.

Law enforcement may clear a case without pursuing charges

Under certain conditions, law enforcement may clear a case and not make an arrest or charge someone. Cases may instead clear through “exceptional means,” which could reflect prosecutors’ inability to compile sufficient evidence or their reluctance to file charges.

Clearing a case does not necessarily mean that a judge handed down a penalty such as incarceration. According to the most recently available Bureau of Justice Statistics report, almost one-third of the individuals accused of a homicide nationwide had their charges dropped or obtained an acquittal.

Chicago clears 135 homicide cases without charges in 2021

As reported by ABC7 Chicago, officials of the Chicago Police Department cleared 135 homicide cases during 2021 with no charges filed against anyone. Overall, the CPD cleared 400 cases involving a homicide that year with the law barring prosecutions in 34% of those cases.

Allegations of wrongdoing may result in charges, but law enforcement may later either drop the charges or decide against prosecuting. Officials may, for example, discover enough evidence to make an arrest, but the evidence collected may not enable a prosecutor to successfully convict.

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